HAPS 2017

May 24-28, 2017 Salt Lake City

Presenters

HAPS Leadership

Sponsors

Exhibitors

Schedule

  • 24 May
  • 25 May
  • 26 May
  • 27 May
  • 28 May
SA

Sumaiya Ahmed

University of Ottawa

27 May

Kurt Albertine

University of Utah
Epigenetics of Evolving Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease - This presentation uses the abrupt environmental change of preterm birth as an example of potential for epigenetic regulation of outcomes early and later in postnatal life. Focus is placed on bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), also called neonatal chronic lung disease. Once this setting is introduced, concepts will be presented regarding histone modifications, starting with description of histones and their interaction with DNA. The combinatorial complexity of histone modifications along a gene is high because of the potential number of modifications, modifiable amino acids, and the number of nucleosomes along the length of a gene. However, genome- wide mapping of global patterns of histone modifications, using chromatin immunoprecipitation with parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq), reveal that patterns of histone modifications are associated with distinct elements within the DNA of a genome. For example, promoters tend to have high levels of histone 3 (H3), lysine 4 (K4) trimethylation (me3), while putative enhancers are characterized by enriched H3K4me1 alone or with H3K27acetylation (ac) or H3K27me3. Gene bodies tend to be enriched with H3K36me2 (or me3) in association with transcriptional activation. H3K4me2 (or me3) and K36me2 (or me3) may contribute to regulating stability of the nucleosome during RNA polymerase II transit. Regulation of gene expression relies on the dynamic nature of histone modifications, thus exemplifying the importance of chromatin modifying enzymes. Genes actively transcribed, or genes that are poised for transcription pending an activating signal (such as transcription factor binding to an enhancer), are characterized by rapid acetylation and deacetylation. These concepts are brought back to the disease context of BPD, using chronically ventilated preterm lambs to illustrate the participation of the HDAC family of enzymes. Preterm lambs managed by invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) develop the disease phenotype of BPD; namely, alveolar simplification. Lungs of preterm lambs managed by IMV also have increased HDAC1 and genome-wide histone hypoacetylation relative to non-invasive respiratory support. In contrast, lungs of preterm lambs managed by non-invasive support have normal alveolar formation and genome-wide histone hyperacetylation. Collectively, these data suggest that IMV upsets the acetylation– deacetylation equilibrium in the immature lung by increasing deacetylation. When preterm lambs managed by IMV are treated with the HDAC inhibitors, valproic acid or trichostatin A, histone acetylation is preserved, as expected. Physiological and morphological measures of alveolar formation are improved. IMV also is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) compared to normal term lambs. The lung of preterm human infants who die with BPD also have low levels of IGF1 mRNA. IGF1 is relevant to this presentation because IGF1 is a morphogen that is involved in lung development, and this gene is epigenetically regulated. The presentation concludes with evidence that dysregulation of IGF1 in the lung of preterm lambs during IMV is causal of alveolar simplification.

25 May

KA

Kayleigh Allender

Clemson University

27 May

KA

Kristi Anderson Zenchak

Oakton Community College

28 May

LA

Lakshmi Atchison

Chestnut Hill College
104 - Human Skin Model: Think Inside the Box! A Novel Educational Tool to Instantly Grasp Skin Structure - Human skin is composed of 40 layers, although students have the misconception that skin is only 2-3 layers thick. This is clarified by a simple hands-on model enabling students to grasp the complexity of skin. A clear plastic box is used with white and pink foam in the bottom representing dermis and hypodermis respectively. Pre-drawn papers represent various epidermal cell layers and the outermost stratum shows hairs peeking through sweat pores. Using this educational tool and lesson plans; students assemble the kit and instantly learn the complexity of human skin tucked inside a box leaving a lasting memory.

25 May

TA

Terry Austin

Temple College

28 May

NA

Nahel Awadallah

Johnston Community College

27 May

28 May

YB

Yvonne Baptiste-Szymanski

Niagara County Community College

28 May

DB

Danielle Barattini

Elizabethtown College
119 - Using station-based teaching to increase material comprehension and integration in Anatomy and Physiology laboratory - At Elizabethtown College, we adapted a station-based approach to teach the musculoskeletal system. During laboratory, groups of students move through stations, where they are exposed to aspects of the musculoskeletal system, including bones, cadavers, and physical exercises. The stations, taught by a teaching assistant or instructor, increase in difficulty and encourage material integration and application. Course evaluations show that a stations-based approach helps comprehension and student comfort level with the material. This teaching approach is flexible, easy to implement using limited resources, and can be used to teach diverse topics of varying difficulty.

25 May

TB

Tynan Becker

University of Alaska Fairbanks

27 May

28 May

MB

Michael Belanich

Suffolk County Community College

27 May

NB

Neelima Bhasvar

St. Louis Community College

27 May

MB

Melaney Birdsong Farr

Salt Lake Community College

27 May

RB

Rhonda Boros

Texas Tech University
311 - Meeting Objectives for the Natural Science Core Curriculum - Anatomy and Physiology courses adopted into the Natural Sciences Core Curriculum must meet additional objectives (i.e., Critical Thinking, Communication, Empirical and Quantitative Skills, Teamwork, Social and Personal Responsibility). To meet these objectives, we designed a single, small group assignment utilizing debate strategy. Controversial topics related to A&P are argued (ex. transgender athletes). Group presentations and written reports were respectively assessed via rubrics, evaluating general verbal and written skills, logical presentation of supporting data, ability to address questions, and proper citations formatting. Data reveal most undergraduates are adept at group presentation and teamwork; however struggle with cohesive and logical scientific writing.

26 May

AB

Arianna Boulet

ADInstruments NA

28 May

TB

Tim Bradshaw

Polk State College
218 - Are 2 day/week classes more effective than 1 day/week classes? - This study compares scores on lecture and lab exams between students that took an Anatomy course that met twice/week and one that met once/week during the same semester. Both options met the same amount of time, covered the same material, and were taught by the same instructor. For the twice/week option (n = 18), lab scores (80.6 + 15.2) and lecture scores (74.6 + 14.1) were similar to lab (82.2 + 9.6) and lecture (75.3 + 11.8) scores of the once/week option (n=16). These data suggest students that want once/week courses receive a similar education to those in twice/week option.

25 May

Dennis Bramble

University of Utah
Built To Run: How Endurance Running Has Shaped Human Form, Function, and Evolution - The unique striding bipedal gait of modern Homo sapiens has made it a central focus in efforts to decipher the history of humankind since before Darwin.  That focus, for more than a century, has been primarily on the functional anatomy and physiology of walking.  More recently  (Bramble and Lieberman, Nature, 2004) it has become evident that the demands of walking, even long-distance walking, fail to account for many of the most striking morphological traits of the human body.  Instead, specialization for endurance running appears to have been much more influential in the evolutionary origin of true humans (i.e., Homo) from our Plio-Pleistocene hominin ancestors.  This discovery has brought renewed attention to many aspects of running, both in the world of science and the commercial domain (e.g., traditional running shoes vs. “minimal footware” vs. barefoot running).  Recognition of the pivotal role that endurance running has played in human history has likewise stimulated new studies in anthropology and paleontology to better understand the behavioral and ecological context in which selection for this unexpected human capability first emerged.  In this lecture I will draw on data from a diversity of disciplines  (comparative and evolutionary morphology, experimental biomechanics, kinesiology, exercise physiology, and paleontology) to make the case that humans are indeed “built to run”, but also that we still have much to learn about this subject.

25 May

DB

David Brashinger

American Public University System
Poster 401 - Lab Instructor Survey Results 
Co-Sponsored by HAPS and ADInstruments
567 participants from 470 institutions responded to a HAPS-sponsored survey of introductory undergraduate A&P instructors. A majority of participants (64%) reported using lab-specific learning outcomes in their courses, and 63% reported significant influence or complete control in determining those outcomes. Of 12 possible lab priorities, participants ranked the following five most important: 1) meeting program objectives, 2) teaching three-dimensional and structure/function relationships, 3) reinforcing lecture content, 4) supporting the development of critical thinking, and 5) engaging and exciting students on the topic of science. Clinical knowledge, science inquiry skills, and science laboratory skills were ranked the lowest priority, and this is consistent with reported practices. Of nine scientific inquiry skills, participants reported the three most commonly performed were data collection (69%), modeling and simulation (49%), and data interpretation (47%). Oral presentation of results (24%), experimental design (20%), and statistical analysis (11%) were the least commonly performed. Based on these findings, scientific inquiry and laboratory skills may be less important in the instruction of introductory pre-health A&P students.

28 May

28 May

CB

Carol A. Britson

University of Mississippi
MOVED TO 219 118 - Bring Your Own Device Initiative to Improve Engagement and Performance in Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II Laboratories - In 2016 we began using adaptors that simultaneously align students’ smartphones to the ocular lens of a microscope in all Human A&P laboratories. We analyzed aggregate scores (i.e., percent correct for tissue identification questions on lab practicals) and Likert-style survey responses to assess students’ performance, interest, and engagement with microscopy and tissue examination in the laboratory. Lab practical scores improved, but not significantly so, between 2015 (adaptors not in use) and 2016 (adaptors in use). Students using adaptors (2016) self-reported significantly higher levels of engagement and understanding of tissues in the A&P laboratory.

25 May

27 May

28 May

JB

Jennifer Marie Burgoon

The Ohio State University

28 May

28 May

28 May